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Using funding from recent settlements through its healthcare division, the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office last week distributed $3 million in grants to organizations addressing social determinants of health.
MHA has released guidelines to assist hospitals develop appropriate programs to administer and/or prescribe MAT in their EDs. Plus a new Congress has been sworn in.
State Attorney Generals across the U.S. will be working through the Christmas holiday preparing expedited briefs supporting the Affordable Care Act, plus a look ahead to 2019.
Each year the state’s Health Policy Commission (HPC) sets a target for per-capita healthcare spending throughout Massachusetts and then tracks the components of the healthcare system to see if the state can meet the goal.
An important Healthcare Safety Summit MHA held last week featured experts from throughout the state discussing not only strategies to prevent healthcare violence and conflict, but initiatives to promote wellness and resilience.
The MHA Alzheimer’s and Related Dementias Workgroup has developed a guidance document to assist hospitals with implementing care and management practices for patients with Alzheimer’s and related dementias.
Recently the Worksite Wellness Council of Massachusetts (WWCMA) announced the winners of its annual WorkWell Massachusetts Awards program that recognizes Massachusetts employers who put in the extra effort to promote a healthy workforce.
By a 70-30 vote, Massachusetts communities in last week’s election rejected ballot Question 1’s rigid, unit-by-unit, patient-to-nurse ratios that would have been imposed on all hospitals at all times.
Hospital staffing should be decided at the bedside by nurses based on a patient’s condition, the experience and education of the nurses in the unit, the technology available at the hospital, and the availability of other care team members.
Anyone that has been on the sidelines to date has solidified their position on the candidates and issues – including on Question 1.
The state’s Health Policy Commission addressed Question 1's costs, workforce requirements, effect on behavioral health, and more.
Emergency Department (ED) wait times will go up and care will be compromised if Question 1 passes – that’s the collective conclusion of ED doctors and nurses, as well as the EMTs who treat and transport patients.
The HPC's unbiased study on nurse-to patient staffing ratios found they will cost $949 million annually and not improve care.
This week, the MNA issued false info about Question 1 and rapped a study (before it was even released).
The Massachusetts physician community has joined just about every other group providing care in Massachusetts to oppose Question 1.
The Massachusetts College of Emergency Physicians and Emergency Nurses Association have released a report opposing passage of Question 1 becasue of its effect on ED care.
Did the Massachusetts law that mandated nurse staffing ratios in intensive care units result in any improvements to patient care in those units? A new study says, NO.
The MNA – representing less than 25% of the nurses in the commonwealth – released a television ad last Wednesday and managed in its 30-second length to disseminate false information.
The Massachusetts Nurses Association, representing less than 25% of the nurses in Massachusetts, continued to spread mistruths this week.
Six mayors from across the Commonwealth are the latest to publicly urge voting NO on Question 1 on the state’s November ballot.

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